News from issue 155 Aug/Sept – local

Kiwi Freediver William Trubridge Sets World Record

After falling 10m short in 2014, Kiwi William Trubridge has come back to set a new freediving world record of 102m, beating his own world record set in 2010 by one metre.

Trubridge plunged into the darkness of the world’s deepest marine cavern, Dean’s Blue Hole in the Bahamas, on the morning of  21 July (NZT). After being submerged for 4min 14s on a single breath, Trubridge surfaced and was reminded to breathe by officials before confirmation came through and the cheering began.

–Stuff, read more: http://tinyurl.com/zwajwkg

 

Banned: No Scalloping for Marlborough Sounds, Parts of Tasman Bay

Image: Zane Mirfin.

Image: Zane Mirfin.

The Marlborough Sounds and part of Tasman Bay will be closed to recreational and commercial scallopers until early 2017 to ensure long-term sustainability of the fishery, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy announced today.

The Southern Scallop Fishery (SCA7), which covered the top and northwest coast of the South Island, will be closed when the season opened on Friday.

Commercial and recreational fishing for scallops in all of the Marlborough Sounds, and part of eastern Tasman Bay will be banned for the coming season until February 14, 2017, Guy said.

–Stuff, read more: http://tinyurl.com/zz53xw7

 

Adapt or Die: Climate Change Puts Pressure on NZ’s Paua

Paua exports are worth around $60M a year, according to Seafood NZ. Image: Jeremy Wilkinson/Fairfax NZ.

Paua exports are worth around $60M a year, according to Seafood NZ. Image: Jeremy Wilkinson/Fairfax NZ.

Nothing can escape climate change, not even one of New Zealand’s national treasures – the paua.

Scientists around the world are worried about the devastating impact acidification of the ocean is having on shellfish.

A new international study indicates mussel farming will not be commercially viable by 2100, and there are concerns the same could happen to the country’s rainbow-shelled species.

–Stuff, read more: http://tinyurl.com/h4zpa27

 

Taniwha Human-Powered Sub World Champion

L–R: Rear Admiral Philip Greenish (CBE CEng FIET), Chris Walker, Iain Anderson, Stefan Jäger, Sanjay Surendren, Gerrit Becker, Ben Pocock. Photo courtesy of IMarEST (Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology).

L–R: Rear Admiral Philip Greenish (CBE CEng FIET), Chris Walker, Iain Anderson, Stefan Jäger, Sanjay Surendren, Gerrit Becker, Ben Pocock. Photo courtesy of IMarEST (Institute of Marine Engineering, Science and Technology).

Competing against 10 other teams from Canada, the Netherlands, Germany, UK and the USA, University of Auckland’s human-propelled submarine, Taniwha, took the winning trophy at the International European Submarine Races. Taniwha II uses Hobie Mirage drive fins for propulsion that are peddled by the pilot who breathes on scuba. The sub’s rear body bends around in a smooth curve, like a fish, enabling the Taniwha to turn without a rudder.

The top speed for Taniwha II (4.7 knots) was very close to the 4.9 knot world record for a non-propeller single pilot sub. The team’s goal is to break record next year at the 14th International Submarine Races, Naval Surface Warfare Centre, Carderock, Maryland USA.

 

CCR makes History News_lcl_kiss

On 19 July we saw the first KISS Re-breather fitted with a sorb canister coated in syntactic foam dived in New Zealand. This incredible insulation foam increases the sorb exothermic temperature and therefore the bottom time. It was tested in Colorado using a KISS Spirit CCR at 3,500m above sea level in 7°C waters using Sofnolime 797. At the end of a two-hour dive the syntactic foam had maintained a canister working temp of 25°C.
For more information on availability ask KISS NZ Sales Agent Tony Howell – tony@scubadiving.co.nz

 

High-tech Drones to Capture Whale Data

Flying high-tech drones close enough to southern right whales to catch some of the bugs they blow out will help tell scientists more about the effects climate change is having on the planet.

An international team of scientists, led by Otago University marine biologist Professor Steve Dawson, this week leaves for the wild and windy sub-antarctic islands for a month-long expedition to shed more light on the nutrition of the big ocean mammals.

What insights they gain will help them discover more about how the species is faring here and around the world, along with how a warming world is affecting one of the most sensitive parts of the globe.

–NZ Herald, read more: http://tinyurl.com/gvq5ja8