Canterbury 1878

Canterbury 1878

CANTERBURY, schooner : Totally wrecked in Tory Channel on March 4, 1878. The schooner was bound from Pelorus Sound to Wellington, and was blown ashore in Okakuri Bay, Tory Channel, where she had anchored for shelter from a strong gale. The vessel dragged her anchors, and the crew were forced to seek their own safety ashore, but later returned to the wreck and succeeded in saving all the schooner’s gear.

The Canterbury, No. 40,329, was a schooner of 38 tons register, built at Pigeon’s Bay, Banks Peninsula, in 1855, and her dimensions were: length 59.2 ft., beam 12.5 ft., depth 6.6 ft. She was under the command of Captain Pike. She had been stranded on at least three previous occasions. On August 13, 1864, when on a voyage from Napier to Wellington, she went ashore in Palliser Bay. She was hauled 15 chains up the beach, repaired, and launched into the Wairarapa Lake, where she lay for about three months until, on June 19, 1865, the lake opened and she was piloted out. She arrived in Wellington on June 29. Again, on July 31, 1873, the Canterbury stranded off the Kaikoura Peninsula, and was thought to be a total wreck. The vessel had sprung a leak, the pump broke down, and she had to be beached. Captain J. Grubb was the master of the schooner. On July 17, 1877, the Canterbury, then commanded by Captain Louis Pike, stranded at Cullen Point, Port of Havelock, but sustained no damage.

(A schooner of the same name was wrecked at Stoddart Point, Banks Peninsula, on January 3, 1865. She struck on the rocks, heeled over, and sank in deep water, and it was not until August of the same year that she was recovered. This vessel was almost certainly the schooner Canterbury, No. 40,348, of 76 tons register, built at Newbury Post, U.S.A., in 1860, her foreign name being Charmer. In February, 1868, it was reported that the schooner Canterbury, bound from Wanganui to Oamaru, had been struck by the full force of a storm in Cook Strait, and had been badly buffeted, the hull coming ashore in two pieces. It has not been possible to identify this vessel but it is believed that the extent of the damage was exaggerated.)

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