Koranui 1889

Koranui 1889

KORANUI, steamer : Totally wrecked on Peige Rocks, French Pass, on the morning of September 27, 1889. The Koranui was bound from Nelson to Wellington, and she was well off the land. When the French Pass light was sighted a course was shaped for it. After being on this course for a short time the steamer struck lightly, at about 2 a.m., on a rock supposed to be the outer edge of the Beef Barrels. She commenced to make water, and the captain ordered the boats to be launched, and the passengers, crew, and mails to be placed in them. There was a fresh south-east wind blow­ing, with a choppy sea, and the boats were made fast to the Koranui under the lee of her stern. After being there over an hour the steamer began to settle down. The boats were then pulled in the direction of the land, and were picked up by the steamer Rotorua, which conveyed the passengers and crew to Nelson.

The Court of Inquiry into the loss of the Koranui found that the master had erred in judge­ment in the course steered after sighting the French Pass light. The vessel appeared to be well found in every way, and to have had her proper complement of boats. The court ordered that the master’s certificate be suspended for three months. The court thought that the captain’s conduct after the vessel struck worthy of all praise.

The Koranui, No. 69,013, was a screw steamer of 488 tons gross and 301 tons net register, built at Paisley, Renfrewshire, in 1883, by Messrs. H. McIntyre and Company, and her dimensions were : length 167.1 ft., beam 25.1 ft., depth 14 ft. Her two engines were of 75 h.p. nominal and 400 h.p. indicated. The Koranui was owned by the Union Steam Ship Company and commanded by Captain Hill.

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